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COVID 19 GLOBAL (non Thailand) Posts


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1 hour ago, Yessongs said:

Not that this is any big revelation, but my Son's GF is a Nurse here in the Capitol of Sacramento. Talked to her last night at 8:00pm local time. She told me there were 15 ICU patients that their families drove them to Sacramento, had rented a special ambulance for them, because there were no ICU beds in Los Angeles. Not good. 

Wow..

Puts it all into perspective, kids always get another chance.

They have time.

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8 hours ago, lazarus said:

Imagine having a family member -- a mother, dad, or child -- seriously ill with Covid and finding out they can't be treated.

F**k. 

What happens in the US if somebody who could not afford to pay for healthcare  gets seriously ill with Covid?

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13 hours ago, Jambo said:

What happens in the US if somebody who could not afford to pay for healthcare  gets seriously ill with Covid?

Health care insurance and/or payment assistance varies from state to state. Low income and poor people can access care but it is often not at the standard of the well-insured (mainly through employment packages). Another issue is sick leave. Many employers do not provide it. Therefore many people still go to work when they are ill.

To answer your question directly, in California where I live:

"The cost of needed COVID-19 diagnosis, testing and treatment for the uninsured is paid for by the government. Check your symptoms using the Symptom Screener or by talking to your doctor. Medically necessary testing is also free through Verily’s Project Baseline or OptumServe"

https://covid19.ca.gov/healthcare/

In the bigger picture:

"In 2018, there were nearly 28 million nonelderly people in the US who lacked health insurance. States that have not expanded Medicaid under the ACA generally have higher uninsured rates than states that did. Adults, low-income individuals and people of color are at greater risk of being uninsured. Most uninsured lack coverage because of high cost or because of a recent change in their situation that led to a loss of coverage, such as a loss of a job. Though most uninsured people have a full time worker (72%) or part-time worker (11%) in their family, many people do not have access to coverage through a job, and some people, particularly poor adults in states that did not expand Medicaid, remain ineligible for financial assistance for coverage."

https://www.kff.org/coronavirus-covid-19/fact-sheet/what-issues-will-uninsured-people-face-with-testing-and-treatment-for-covid-19/

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3 hours ago, Jambo said:

What happens in the US if somebody who could not afford to pay for healthcare  gets seriously ill with Covid?

You will be treated regardless of your ability to pay, per the law.

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London if f***d....

More than 800 patients a day are being admitted to London hospitals with COVID-19, the chief executive of NHS England, Sir Simon Stevens, warned at a Downing Street briefing on Thursday.

"That's the equivalent of a new St Thomas' hospital, full of COVID patients every day," he said.

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5 minutes ago, coxyhog said:

London if f***d....

More than 800 patients a day are being admitted to London hospitals with COVID-19, the chief executive of NHS England, Sir Simon Stevens, warned at a Downing Street briefing on Thursday.

"That's the equivalent of a new St Thomas' hospital, full of COVID patients every day," he said.

Very bad where I live, too. And, we'd been doing quite well up to the last month or so...

Bay Area ICU availability falls to lowest level yet, as state tries to speed up vaccinations

https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Bay-Area-ICU-availability-falls-to-lowest-level-15854311.php

Intensive care availability at Bay Area hospitals fell to the lowest levels yet, dropping from 7.4% to just 3.5% as of Wednesday, according to state data.

Statewide, intensive care unit capacity remained at 0%, including in the two hardest hit regions, Southern California and San Joaquin Valley. ICU capacity fell in the Sacramento region from 11.1% to 9.2%, and ticked up slightly in the Northern California region from 24.4% to 25.4%...

 

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14 hours ago, Jambo said:

What happens in the US if somebody who could not afford to pay for healthcare  gets seriously ill with Covid?

They treat and release.

Adults with serious, chronic, long term illness go on welfare (medicaid). That means all of your assets have to be spent down (other than a house if you happen to own one) before you can be eligible. Then when on it much of your income goes to paying them back. They limit what you can earn and keep severely. 

If you are hospitalized long term (like a nursing home) when you are released or die the assets of the home then has to be used to pay them back. 

The only other option.... when you get seriously sick is to go to the E.R. when some kind of symptom kicks up. You go in they stabalize you until you can be released. Then you go do whatever you were doing until the next flare up. This then continues until you drop fucking dead.

Say if you get cancer.....

--- they test you, tell you have cancer, tell you what you need, give you some meds for pain   ---- then you pay cash for treatment, go on medicaid (get treated, but live the rest of your life in poverty), or go off in a corner somewhere and die.

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We are starting to get cases at work now. Got people off with it, one guy in his late 30s is quite poorly, though no hospital admissions. Had one guy who was around 70 die last Easter. 

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13 hours ago, Glasseye said:

They treat and release.

Adults with serious, chronic, long term illness go on welfare (medicaid). That means all of your assets have to be spent down (other than a house if you happen to own one) before you can be eligible. Then when on it much of your income goes to paying them back. They limit what you can earn and keep severely. 

If you are hospitalized long term (like a nursing home) when you are released or die the assets of the home then has to be used to pay them back. 

The only other option.... when you get seriously sick is to go to the E.R. when some kind of symptom kicks up. You go in they stabalize you until you can be released. Then you go do whatever you were doing until the next flare up. This then continues until you drop fucking dead.

Say if you get cancer.....

--- they test you, tell you have cancer, tell you what you need, give you some meds for pain   ---- then you pay cash for treatment, go on medicaid (get treated, but live the rest of your life in poverty), or go off in a corner somewhere and die.

Total BS, at least here in Hawaii.

My friends Thai GF, who had no job or assets, suddenly could not remember where her car was parked. They called 911, rushed her to a hospitable and after tests, airlifted her to Honolulu at a cost of $90,000 or so. After a few days, they found a brain tumor and scheduled a operation in 10 days with a specialist. Cost, maybe $400,000 but she paid nothing with no obligation to repay anything. 

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From Sky News today - 100% reflects what I've seen in the past 10 months in the UK- nothing has changed.

"Best source of information on the complex psychology of coronavirus compliance: the COVID-19 Social Study - a research study by University College London.

It asks 70,000 adults every week about the effects of the virus and social distancing and the responses on compliance are fascinating.

Women follow the rules more closely than men. White people follow them more than people from ethnic minorities. Richer people tend to be less compliant. So do key workers and 18-to-29-year-olds."

https://news.sky.com/story/covid-19-lockdown-mobility-data-shows-people-have-become-accustomed-to-bending-the-rules-12182919

 

 

 

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My 91yo mother received a letter today inviting her to book an appointment for a Covid jab so I tried to do it online.

The nearest place of the four she was offered was 25 miles away,the farthest about 150.

I know for a fact that they are doing them at her local doctors surgery which is < 1 mile down the road.

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Women follow the rules more closely than men. White people follow them more than people from ethnic minorities. Richer people tend to be less compliant. So do key workers and 18-to-29-year-olds.

The amazing thing here is that ethnics are more likely to die from it.

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3 minutes ago, coxyhog said:

Women follow the rules more closely than men. White people follow them more than people from ethnic minorities. Richer people tend to be less compliant. So do key workers and 18-to-29-year-olds.

The amazing thing here is that ethnics are more likely to die from it.

As are men vs women 

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10 minutes ago, coxyhog said:

My 91yo mother received a letter today inviting her to book an appointment for a Covid jab so I tried to do it online.

The nearest place of the four she was offered was 25 miles away,the farthest about 150.

I know for a fact that they are doing them at her local doctors surgery which is < 1 mile down the road.

Maybe she was being offered the Pfizer vaccine which has special storage requirements, -70°C. Perhaps it has a better result in her age group.

 

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13 minutes ago, fygjam said:

Maybe she was being offered the Pfizer vaccine which has special storage requirements, -70°C. Perhaps it has a better result in her age group.

 

Well she's going to call her surgery on Monday.She still drives but never very far,25m is out of the question & me & the missus have been keen to keep away from her for obvious reasons.Apart from that they're telling us not to travel!

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31 minutes ago, coxyhog said:

Women follow the rules more closely than men. White people follow them more than people from ethnic minorities. Richer people tend to be less compliant. So do key workers and 18-to-29-year-olds.

The amazing thing here is that ethnics are more likely to die from it.

Are ethnics more likely to die from it, or are more ethnics dying from it because they don't follow the rules as much? I'm not aware of any genetic predisposition regarding covid. 

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4 minutes ago, Esco said:

Are ethnics more likely to die from it, or are more ethnics dying from it because they don't follow the rules as much? I'm not aware of any genetic predisposition regarding covid. 

In a podcast I listened to a few days ago, a prominent Covid research doctor said "no" when asked if they have found any indications of genetic predisposition for infection.

She did say that one of the main cause for higher infection rates in certain groups is bigger families living closer together in one home. Very difficult for people to isolate the sick in this circumstance and the viral load in the air is often higher.

 

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Just now, lazarus said:

In a podcast I listened to a few days ago, a prominent Covid research doctor said "no" when asked if they have found any indications of genetic predisposition for infection.

She did say that one of the main cause for higher infection rates in certain groups is bigger families living closer together in one home. Very difficult for people to isolate the sick in this circumstance and the viral load in the air is often higher.

 

Yes certain ethnicities seem to have higher incidence of infection but the research seems to show it is related more to socio-economic indicators than their ethnicity alone.

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6 minutes ago, Horizondave said:

Yes certain ethnicities seem to have higher incidence of infection but the research seems to show it is related more to socio-economic indicators than their ethnicity alone.

And their own behaviour,remember the crowds celebrating Pakistan Independence Day?

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57 minutes ago, coxyhog said:

My 91yo mother received a letter today inviting her to book an appointment for a Covid jab so I tried to do it online.

The nearest place of the four she was offered was 25 miles away,the farthest about 150.

I know for a fact that they are doing them at her local doctors surgery which is < 1 mile down the road.

Boris's dad had his 2nd shot yesterday. 

Bet the c**t never even had to leave the house. 

 

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