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30 minutes ago, Horizondave said:

No doubt keeping an eye on proceedings though, he is on line all the time.......

Hasn't posted this year. Maybe someone broke his pencil.

 

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1 hour ago, fygjam said:

Hasn't posted this year. Maybe someone broke his pencil.

 

Reminds me of my daughter commenting yesterday on a form of transport for her homework, she saw a pram and the kid had thrown a doll out of it. I told her luckily she had moved on from prams although occasionally she does throw a tantrum and the doll goes flying. She is learning though that she has to follow rules for her benefit and others.

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1 hour ago, Horizondave said:

Reminds me of my daughter commenting yesterday on a form of transport for her homework, she saw a pram and the kid had thrown a doll out of it. I told her luckily she had moved on from prams although occasionally she does throw a tantrum and the doll goes flying. She is learning though that she has to follow rules for her benefit and others.

I am free, no matter what rules surround me. ...

Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist

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After being told by my mums surgery that they would text me inviting my mum to ring them for an appointment for a vaccine I ran out of patience today & called them again.

I think they'd forgotten her,she's now got an appointment for Thursday.

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4 hours ago, Horizondave said:

She is 5 years of age!

Bro ..  I know she is young .. just like Ziggy ...  just blowing shit .... but, I think .. at least in my case .. rules were always made to be broken ...  lol ,.... really surprised I have made it this long .. alive and healthy with all the rules I have broken ... f**k me .. a delinquent I am

Now that I am a Dad .. I think rules are " Ok " for the young ones ... Being a Dad has changed my perspective " a little" ... just " a little " ...

 

Edited by code_slayer_bkk
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My 85 year old mother had her jab on friday. Her appointment was 10.48. There was a queue of about 20, she waited for about 8 minutes  was done and went home. 

Slight headache reported that evening, but back to normal by Saturday. 

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Personally ... only my thoughts ... f**k a jab .. especially this early within the process ... only my thoughts once again .. the fucking mass hysteria has gotten everyone worked up .... plus, a totally inept government mandating and dictating how and what I do with my life .. f**k them !

Edited by code_slayer_bkk
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13 minutes ago, Painter said:

My 85 year old mother had her jab on friday. Her appointment was 10.48. There was a queue of about 20, she waited for about 8 minutes  was done and went home. 

Slight headache reported that evening, but back to normal by Saturday. 

Children of the war generation made of stern stuff 👍

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27 minutes ago, code_slayer_bkk said:

Personally ... only my thoughts ... f**k a jab .. especially this early within the process ... only my thoughts once again .. the fucking mass hysteria has gotten everyone worked up .... plus, a totally inept government mandating and dictating how and what I do with my life .. f**k them !

By the time the vaccine is available to a youngster like you in TH there will be more information about it's efficacy.

Interestingly though, tobacco smokers are being giving priority in some US locales as they are considered "high risk."

. . .

Smokers in N.J. Are Eligible for Vaccine. No Proof Needed.
New Jersey is one of only two states that has included smoking among the high-risk medical conditions that make people eligible for the Covid-19 vaccine.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/15/nyregion/nj-vaccine-smokers-covid.html

. . .The C.D.C. includes smoking on a list of medical conditions that it recommends be prioritized in state vaccination programs because of the higher risk of serious complications from Covid-19. But to date, only one other state, Mississippi, appears to have authorized vaccinations for people younger than 65 based solely on the criterion that they smoke cigarettes.

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2 hours ago, Washedup said:

Children of the war generation made of stern stuff 👍

Absolutely,around 10 years ago I had to take my mum,who is 91 now,to A & E with a broken wrist.

The doc asked her how she did it.I was pulling a tree up & slipped she said.

"YOU were pulling a tree up?" said the doc increduously.

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34 minutes ago, coxyhog said:

Absolutely,around 10 years ago I had to take my mum,who is 91 now,to A & E with a broken wrist.

The doc asked her how she did it.I was pulling a tree up & slipped she said.

"YOU were pulling a tree up?" said the doc increduously.

Unfortunately soon to be a lost generation, both of my parents were of a similar ilk.

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10 hours ago, lazarus said:

By the time the vaccine is available to a youngster like you in TH there will be more information about it's efficacy.

Interestingly though, tobacco smokers are being giving priority in some US locales as they are considered "high risk."

. . .

Smokers in N.J. Are Eligible for Vaccine. No Proof Needed.
New Jersey is one of only two states that has included smoking among the high-risk medical conditions that make people eligible for the Covid-19 vaccine.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/15/nyregion/nj-vaccine-smokers-covid.html

. . .The C.D.C. includes smoking on a list of medical conditions that it recommends be prioritized in state vaccination programs because of the higher risk of serious complications from Covid-19. But to date, only one other state, Mississippi, appears to have authorized vaccinations for people younger than 65 based solely on the criterion that they smoke cigarettes.

Yea Bro .. I am way past trying to understand .....

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EU is considering 'vaccine passports' under pressure from countries like Portugal and Greece that depend on tourism. I think it's a good idea. Absolutely no reason why someone who has been vaccinated should be prohibited from travelling.

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4 minutes ago, dcfc2007 said:

Absolutely no reason why someone who has been vaccinated should be prohibited from travelling.

So has it now been determined that a vaccinated person cannot carry and pass on the virus? 

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11 hours ago, boydeste said:

Unfortunately soon to be a lost generation, both of my parents were of a similar ilk.

But blessed to have lived in a much better era.. 

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1 hour ago, Bazle said:

So has it now been determined that a vaccinated person cannot carry and pass on the virus? 

Nobody knows. We do know that the vaccines are very effective at preventing people from getting sick. The Greeks and the Portuguese and other tourist economies can't go another year without tourism, it will destroy more businesses and lives than the virus ever will. Allowing vaccinated people to travel is a sensible compromise that any right thinking individual would support.

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45 minutes ago, dcfc2007 said:

Nobody knows. We do know that the vaccines are very effective at preventing people from getting sick. The Greeks and the Portuguese and other tourist economies can't go another year without tourism, it will destroy more businesses and lives than the virus ever will. Allowing vaccinated people to travel is a sensible compromise that any right thinking individual would support.

I doubt it’s that straight forward given that people who have been vaccinated may still be able to carry and spread the virus. I can see it being at the discretion of the country receiving the tourists and whether their vaccine programme has progressed far enough, also wouldn’t be surprised if you needed a negative test to travel as well.

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36 minutes ago, Sangsom said:

I doubt it’s that straight forward given that people who have been vaccinated may still be able to carry and spread the virus. I can see it being at the discretion of the country receiving the tourists and whether their vaccine programme has progressed far enough, also wouldn’t be surprised if you needed a negative test to travel as well.

It should be that straightforward. If you are vaccinated then you are immune to serious illness. It's a misnomer that the vaccine must prevent transmission, other vaccines have not prevented transmission and yet are widely considered a success. At some point we must move on from this, if that's not a vaccine then please tell me when?

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/vaccines-need-not-completely-stop-covid-transmission-to-curb-the-pandemic/

Although many vaccines widely used today (against measles, for example) produce very effective sterilizing immunity, others, such as the hepatitis B vaccine, do not. With these vaccines, an individual’s immune system is trained to prevent illness, yet the pathogen can persist in that person’s body, potentially allowing them to infect others. A lack of sterilizing immunity means that the pathogen can continue to circulate in a population, where it may cause illness in unvaccinated and vulnerable people or evolve to evade our immune responses, Bowdish explains.

Sterilizing immunity may have been a lofty goal for COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers, though not necessary to curb disease. According to Crowcroft, the very concept of such immunity is nuanced. “In reality, the spectrum of protection might best be framed as the extent to which vaccination prevents transmission of the wild-type virus or bacteria,” she says.

The case of rotavirus—which causes severe vomiting and watery diarrhea and is especially dangerous to infants and young children—is fairly straightforward. Vaccination limits, but does not stop, the pathogen from replicating. As such, it does not protect against mild disease. By reducing an infected person’s viral load, however, it decreases transmission, providing substantial indirect protection. According to the Centers for Disease Control, four to 10 years after the 2006 introduction of a rotavirus vaccine in the U.S., the number of positive tests for the disease fell by as much as 74 to 90 percent .

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6 minutes ago, dcfc2007 said:

It should be that straightforward. If you are vaccinated then you are immune to serious illness. It's a misnomer that the vaccine must prevent transmission, other vaccines have not prevented transmission and yet are widely considered a success. At some point we must move on from this, if that's not a vaccine then please tell me when?

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/vaccines-need-not-completely-stop-covid-transmission-to-curb-the-pandemic/

Although many vaccines widely used today (against measles, for example) produce very effective sterilizing immunity, others, such as the hepatitis B vaccine, do not. With these vaccines, an individual’s immune system is trained to prevent illness, yet the pathogen can persist in that person’s body, potentially allowing them to infect others. A lack of sterilizing immunity means that the pathogen can continue to circulate in a population, where it may cause illness in unvaccinated and vulnerable people or evolve to evade our immune responses, Bowdish explains.

Sterilizing immunity may have been a lofty goal for COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers, though not necessary to curb disease. According to Crowcroft, the very concept of such immunity is nuanced. “In reality, the spectrum of protection might best be framed as the extent to which vaccination prevents transmission of the wild-type virus or bacteria,” she says.

The case of rotavirus—which causes severe vomiting and watery diarrhea and is especially dangerous to infants and young children—is fairly straightforward. Vaccination limits, but does not stop, the pathogen from replicating. As such, it does not protect against mild disease. By reducing an infected person’s viral load, however, it decreases transmission, providing substantial indirect protection. According to the Centers for Disease Control, four to 10 years after the 2006 introduction of a rotavirus vaccine in the U.S., the number of positive tests for the disease fell by as much as 74 to 90 percent .

I’m agreeing with you re transmission. I just think that some countries will have something to say about travellers coming to holiday in their countries if they aren’t on top of their own vaccine programmes. Also think there is a good chance they will ask for negative tests before travel.

Given we are doing way better that most in vaccine rollout some countries may not be on top of their vaccine programmes before the summer.

Edited by Sangsom
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Getting worse...

Los Angeles lifts air-quality limits for cremations amid a backlog of bodies caused by COVID-19

As of Jan. 15, more than 2,700 bodies are currently being stored at local area hospitals and the coroner’s office in Los Angeles County

https://www.foxnews.com/health/los-angeles-lifts-air-quality-limits-for-cremations-amid-backlog-of-bodies-caused-by-covid-19

A California air quality agency has temporarily suspended limits on how many bodies can be cremated amid a lack of storage space for those who died from the novel coronavirus.

The South Coast Air Quality Management District issued an emergency order on Sunday that temporarily suspends permit requirements for crematoriums for at least the next 10 days in Los Angeles County.

The air pollution agency limits the number of human remains that may be cremated each month, based on potential air quality impacts. However, the pandemic has caused the current death rate to skyrocket, placing a strain on hospitals, funeral homes, and crematoriums.

"The current rate of death is more than double that of pre-pandemic years, leading to hospitals, funeral homes, and crematoriums exceeding capacity without the ability to process the backlog of cases," South Coast AQMD said in a news release...

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Testing will be part of international travel for the rest of 2021 IMHO, regardless of any vaccine.

Next month I will need a test before I leave Thailand and another in UK after 5 days isolation, if I don't want to isolate for 10 days. I don't because I want to start work ASAP when I get back.

Of course there is the cost factor and the nightmare of a false positive to contend with.

Such is life in 2021. Get on with it.

 

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