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Under 300 Baht ... And Good


Evil Penevil
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I've finally gotten around to writing up a review of Simon's Hummus Laboratory on Soi Buakhao at the north side of Buakhao Night Market.  It's on the upper level above the SCB branch and next to Amazon Coffee. Whether it's on the first or second floor depends on what country you come from.  😄  It's easy to miss Simon's because there is no eye-catching signage on the ground level. The yellow arrow marks the entrance to Simon's.

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Simon's is an Israeli and Middle Eastern restaurant.  As the name indicates and the Web site proclaims, it is focused on "hummus, hummus and more hummus."  In Israel and at Simon's, hummus has gone beyond an appetizer (meze) or accompaniment for drinks and become The Base for main courses.  

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The mainstay of the menu seems to be hummus platters in numerous variations accompanied by pita bread and small side dishes of cabbage, carrots and hot sauce. I like the classic hummus with falafel and have had it several times.

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It costs 180 baht.

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Hummus itself is boiled, mashed chickpeas, which can be bland.  The addition of olive oil, herbs and spices give it a lot more flavor, as do the side dishes.

IMG_0210.jpg.e47660490ded5d78e9a6c497645e5db1.jpg

 The portion is large enough for a light lunch or supper.  But if you're looking for a more substantial meal, Simon's doesn't disappoint.  The baked chicken with potatoes is very good at 220 baht.

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There's plenty of chicken and potatoes in a well-seasoned sauce.  It comes with the same side dishes as the hummus platter.

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I don't usually post "after" pics, but one below shows how much I enjoyed my meal.

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Another favorite of mine at Simon's is the shakshuka,  a combination of poached eggs simmered with tomatoes, onions, garlic and spices. It costs 150 baht. There are many variations of shakshuka and at Simon's it comes with cheese melted on the eggs.

IMG_0205a.thumb.jpg.3b80ecc27a108d22f48ec09068aaf063.jpg

Food historians can't decide if it originated in Turkey, Morocco or Yemen, but it has been adopted as an Israeli staple, eaten for breakfast or dinner.

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It's light and healthy, but filling. I much prefer it over Western fried breakfasts.

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Simon's has many tasty and interesting dishes from Israel and other Middle Eastern countries.  I'll post excerpts from the menu at the end of this review

The decor at Simon's is eclectic to say the least.

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It's clean and well-lit.  I can't remember anything about the background music, so it must have been unobtrusive.

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The service staff and Simon himself are friendly.  Each time  I've eaten there, he's asked me how the food was.

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Bottom line:  The Israeli food at Simon's may be new to a lot of plain-vanilla farang, but don't hesitate to try it.  Simon's is open every day from 10.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m.

Evil

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I've had Nueng's pies in the past and they are good, but I fully acknowledge I have limited experience of UK-style meat pies.  She's located on the Darksideand used to delivery, but I can't see any mention of delivery on her FB page.  All the pics come from that page.

 

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14 minutes ago, Evil Penevil said:

I've had Nueng's pies in the past and they are good, but I fully acknowledge I have limited experience of UK-style meat pies.  She's located on the Darksideand used to delivery, but I can't see any mention of delivery on her FB page.  All the pics come from that page.

 

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Delivery is free for orders 300b plus. I've had several,  early afternoon seems better for her as she delivers to lk metro. Great pies, delivered frozen, cold, or hot, up to you. Very quick to reply on fb.

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On 1/13/2019 at 8:18 AM, Evil Penevil said:

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I've finally gotten around to writing up a review of Simon's Hummus Laboratory on Soi Buakhao at the north side of Buakhao Night Market.  It's on the upper level above the SCB branch and next to Amazon Coffee. Whether it's on the first or second floor depends on what country you come from.  😄  It's easy to miss Simon's because there is no eye-catching signage on the ground level. The yellow arrow marks the entrance to Simon's.

IMG_0215.jpg.dd858b71a2bd7e8e7bc800cb98daff72.jpg

Simon's is an Israeli and Middle Eastern restaurant.  As the name indicates and the Web site proclaims, it is focused on "hummus, hummus and more hummus."  In Israel and at Simon's, hummus has gone beyond an appetizer (meze) or accompaniment for drinks and become The Base for main courses.  

IMG_0094.jpg.ba3b88a20dbb1464bcb74707e28707a2.jpg

The mainstay of the menu seems to be hummus platters in numerous variations accompanied by pita bread and small side dishes of cabbage, carrots and hot sauce. I like the classic hummus with falafel and have had it several times.

IMG_0205.jpg.339211273a787d12fdda45eb4292a1a7.jpg

It costs 180 baht.

IMG_0091.jpg.dcdf95c1a55fed34cd03b4abbbd4b29a.jpg

Hummus itself is boiled, mashed chickpeas, which can be bland.  The addition of olive oil, herbs and spices give it a lot more flavor, as do the side dishes.

IMG_0210.jpg.e47660490ded5d78e9a6c497645e5db1.jpg

 The portion is large enough for a light lunch or supper.  But if you're looking for a more substantial meal, Simon's doesn't disappoint.  The baked chicken with potatoes is very good at 220 baht.

IMG_0080.jpg.208ea8bf30ecec6403a050e0756bb589.jpg

There's plenty of chicken and potatoes in a well-seasoned sauce.  It comes with the same side dishes as the hummus platter.

IMG_0083a.jpg.b5f21d52118475b50a6004b58ee94b70.jpg

I don't usually post "after" pics, but one below shows how much I enjoyed my meal.

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Another favorite of mine at Simon's is the shakshuka,  a combination of poached eggs simmered with tomatoes, onions, garlic and spices. It costs 150 baht. There are many variations of shakshuka and at Simon's it comes with cheese melted on the eggs.

IMG_0205a.thumb.jpg.3b80ecc27a108d22f48ec09068aaf063.jpg

Food historians can't decide if it originated in Turkey, Morocco or Yemen, but it has been adopted as an Israeli staple, eaten for breakfast or dinner.

IMG_0207a.jpg.80fca49e845c47be2eba63df6bd1d923.jpg

It's light and healthy, but filling. I much prefer it over Western fried breakfasts.

IMG_0210a.jpg.b5f50a5d041e2477977789e1507b339a.jpg

Simon's has many tasty and interesting dishes from Israel and other Middle Eastern countries.  I'll post excerpts from the menu at the end of this review

The decor at Simon's is eclectic to say the least.

IMG_0088.jpg.b8ed61cd3a71b5151b38d4765a0e0632.jpg

It's clean and well-lit.  I can't remember anything about the background music, so it must have been unobtrusive.

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The service staff and Simon himself are friendly.  Each time  I've eaten there, he's asked me how the food was.

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Bottom line:  The Israeli food at Simon's may be new to a lot of plain-vanilla farang, but don't hesitate to try it.  Simon's is open every day from 10.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m.

Evil

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Love this type of food. 

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On 1/13/2019 at 9:16 AM, Horizondave said:

Simon's is just the type of food I love,

Reminds me of a place called Ogen in Hua Hin that looks the same size and design, also I believe an Israeli establishment; maybe there is a connection although no doubt a few Israelis in Thailand..

Yes, tried this place and enjoyed it. Nice people that run it as well 

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On 1/13/2019 at 3:18 PM, Evil Penevil said:

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I've finally gotten around to writing up a review of Simon's Hummus Laboratory on Soi Buakhao at the north side of Buakhao Night Market.  It's on the upper level above the SCB branch and next to Amazon Coffee. Whether it's on the first or second floor depends on what country you come from.  😄  It's easy to miss Simon's because there is no eye-catching signage on the ground level. The yellow arrow marks the entrance to Simon's.

IMG_0215.jpg.dd858b71a2bd7e8e7bc800cb98daff72.jpg

Simon's is an Israeli and Middle Eastern restaurant.  As the name indicates and the Web site proclaims, it is focused on "hummus, hummus and more hummus."  In Israel and at Simon's, hummus has gone beyond an appetizer (meze) or accompaniment for drinks and become The Base for main courses.  

IMG_0094.jpg.ba3b88a20dbb1464bcb74707e28707a2.jpg

The mainstay of the menu seems to be hummus platters in numerous variations accompanied by pita bread and small side dishes of cabbage, carrots and hot sauce. I like the classic hummus with falafel and have had it several times.

IMG_0205.jpg.339211273a787d12fdda45eb4292a1a7.jpg

It costs 180 baht.

IMG_0091.jpg.dcdf95c1a55fed34cd03b4abbbd4b29a.jpg

Hummus itself is boiled, mashed chickpeas, which can be bland.  The addition of olive oil, herbs and spices give it a lot more flavor, as do the side dishes.

IMG_0210.jpg.e47660490ded5d78e9a6c497645e5db1.jpg

 The portion is large enough for a light lunch or supper.  But if you're looking for a more substantial meal, Simon's doesn't disappoint.  The baked chicken with potatoes is very good at 220 baht.

IMG_0080.jpg.208ea8bf30ecec6403a050e0756bb589.jpg

There's plenty of chicken and potatoes in a well-seasoned sauce.  It comes with the same side dishes as the hummus platter.

IMG_0083a.jpg.b5f21d52118475b50a6004b58ee94b70.jpg

I don't usually post "after" pics, but one below shows how much I enjoyed my meal.

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Another favorite of mine at Simon's is the shakshuka,  a combination of poached eggs simmered with tomatoes, onions, garlic and spices. It costs 150 baht. There are many variations of shakshuka and at Simon's it comes with cheese melted on the eggs.

IMG_0205a.thumb.jpg.3b80ecc27a108d22f48ec09068aaf063.jpg

Food historians can't decide if it originated in Turkey, Morocco or Yemen, but it has been adopted as an Israeli staple, eaten for breakfast or dinner.

IMG_0207a.jpg.80fca49e845c47be2eba63df6bd1d923.jpg

It's light and healthy, but filling. I much prefer it over Western fried breakfasts.

IMG_0210a.jpg.b5f50a5d041e2477977789e1507b339a.jpg

Simon's has many tasty and interesting dishes from Israel and other Middle Eastern countries.  I'll post excerpts from the menu at the end of this review

The decor at Simon's is eclectic to say the least.

IMG_0088.jpg.b8ed61cd3a71b5151b38d4765a0e0632.jpg

It's clean and well-lit.  I can't remember anything about the background music, so it must have been unobtrusive.

IMG_0199.jpg.bdf9e9ca5a525a4111d43832f70211fb.jpg

The service staff and Simon himself are friendly.  Each time  I've eaten there, he's asked me how the food was.

IMG_0201a.jpg.080cdc320a0727d099ad0a312b1eb69b.jpg

Bottom line:  The Israeli food at Simon's may be new to a lot of plain-vanilla farang, but don't hesitate to try it.  Simon's is open every day from 10.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m.

Evil

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1 minute ago, AJSP said:

Love this type of food. 

Goodness me, how did I miss that. 

Definitely getting a rattle soon. 

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Il Peccatore ("The Sinner') is an Italian restaurant that's been open since mid-November on Soi Lengkee, about half way between Soi Buakhao and 3rd Road.  I read that the owner named it Il Peccatore because Pattaya is a city of sinners. 

It features indoor and outdoor dining areas, with the enclosed area strictly non-smoking.  The indoor area had about 15 diners when I arrived and I didn't want to get intrusive with my camera, so I only took pictures of the bar area.

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I had been meaning to try Il Peccatore for awhile, but  never got around to it until last night.  Il Peccatore posts its daily specials on its Facebook page and yesterday's special really caught my eye: paccheri cacio e pepe.  Il Peccatore

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Paccheri is large tubular pasta and cacio e pepe translates as "cheese and pepper."  The cheese is pecorino romano, a very salty type made from sheep's milk.  Cacio e pepe is one of the oldest dishes in Italian cuisine, dating back to shepherds in Roman times. It's a simple dish, consisting of only a few ingredients, namely cheese, pasta and pepper. Modern variations often add extra virgin olive oil to give the sauce a shine.

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Since the 1950s, cacio e pepe has become a staple in Rome's restaurants and has more recently become popular outside Italy.  In 2016, it was named by a New York City magazine as the year's "trendiest dish."  I haven't seen it before on a menu in Pattaya, so I was eager to try it.

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I wasn't disappointed.  The sauce was excellent and coated the fresh pasta as it should. 

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I thought it  could do with a bit more pepper and ground more on the pasta from the miniature pepper mill on the condiment tray.  A basket of fresh bread preceded the pasta.

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After the meal. the waitress offered me a complimentary glass of chilled limoncello as a digestif.  Nice touch!  I really like limoncello. 

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I was happy with the meal.  The portion wasn't large, but the paccheri was very filling and adequate for me.  Considering the meal was based on fresh pasta and pecorino romano and included bread and limoncello,  I thought it was value for money at 270 baht.  I know there are restaurants where you can get bigger plates of spaghetti for half the price, but a mound of dry pasta with canned sauce  is a long way from paccheri cacio e pepe. 

The service was fast and friendly. The waitress I had spoke good English, which isn't always the case in Pattaya restaurants. The owner (or perhaps manager) greeted me both on my way in and out.  I didn't study the menu, but there seemed to be a wide range of Italian dishes, including pizza.

I noticed another diner had taken the other special, the grilled T-bone steak for 490 baht, and I almost regretted my decision to go with the pasta.  The steak looked large and thick and the gentleman ate it with gusto.  Il Peccatore's daily specials follow a pattern of fresh pasta dishes under 300 baht and a meat dish (beef, lamb, pork, duck) under 500 baht.  The meat dishes aren't necessarily Italian, such as roast beef with roasted potatoes and T-bone steak.  I'll include some photos of the daily special lists from Il Peccatore's FB page at the end of this post.

From what I overhead of the other guests' table conversation, almost all were Italian. That's a decent comment on the quality of the food.

Bottom line:  I'll definitely go back for another taste of Italy and maybe the steak and roast lamb as well.

Evil

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1 hour ago, Thai Spice said:

When everything is written is the restaurant's native language it is usually a good sign. They know what they're speaking about and probably have a cook / chef who knows what he is doing.

The chef is Italian, at least that is what I've been told.  Cacio e pepe is tricky to make and I doubt anyone but an Italian chef would try it.

Evil

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I'm a big fan of Taco Taco, but I haven't been back too many times since they moved to  Soi 9 off Pattaya Klang, simply because the old location, a stall in the Soi Buakhao night market, was more convenient for me.  

No doubt, though, that the new enclosed, air-conditioned  restaurant is a far more comfortable place to have a meal than a fold-up table in front of the old stall.  The menu has expanded considerably, too.

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I went back yesterday to try the Taco Tuesday special:

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And a tempting pic from Taco Taco's Facebook page:

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The following tacos cost 60 baht each all day Tuesday and you can mix and match as you please:

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You can also choose hard-shell corn tortillas or soft wheat tortillas.  I picked column B and had the conchinita pibil and chicken tinga in corn tortillas and the smoky beef on a wheat tortilla.

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The order came with three in-house-made sauces: the iconic Mexican pico de gallo (aka salsa fresca or salsa mexicana); habanero chili hot sauce (fiery hot 16.jpg.e53e447b03ec69093207c176696b3d3d.jpg ) and pineapple salsa.

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The pork, chicken and beef in the tacos had been slow-cooked with Mexican spices.  The cook didn't skimp on the chili content and the chicken tinga and smoky beef had quite a kick without the hot sauce.  The conchinita pibil was a bit milder with a sweet-sour flavor to the pork.  It's based on a traditional pork dish from the Yucatán Peninsula and is a favorite of mine.  I hope Taco Taco spins off conchinita pibil into a main dish and not just a taco filling.

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The meal cost 180 baht for the three tortillas and 20 baht for a bottle of water.

Bottom line:    Since Dave's Cantina closed, these are the best tacos in Pattaya.  They aren't the biggest, but definitely the best tasting.  Some other taco variations on offer on the regular menu.

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Taco Taco also has weekly specials and this week it's three-bean chili con carne with rice and nachos:

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Evil

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Tigglebitties Tavern is an American restaurant that serves mainstream U.S. food; Tex-Mex and Mexico-inspired  dishes; and Thai food.  It's located on Soi 17 (aka Soi Regional Land) about five minutes' walk south of the intersection with 3rd Road and ten minutes' walk from Tukcom.

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The great  thing about Tigglebitties is that the owners and kitchen staff understand what American food is about and how it should taste. It's also one of the few restaurants in Pattaya to offer freshly baked U.S.-style biscuits, including biscuits and gravy.  It also features in-house-made U.S. desserts like apple and pumpkin pies and carrot cake.  Prices are quite reasonable for the quality of food and large portions.

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It's an open-front bar and restaurant with a casual tavern atmosphere.  The fans keep the interior reasonably cool.  It can get noisy, though, as Soi Regional land is heavily trafficked. Tigglebitties is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

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Every day Tigglebitties has two specials, usually one main dish and one appetizer or snack. They are true specials; they often aren't on the regular menu. The other day I tried the fish taco:

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 In the U.S., these are called Baja fish tacos.  Japanese commercial fishermen were frequent visitors to the coastal cities of Baja California in Mexico during the 1960s.  A group of them asked a  taco stand operator to batter the fish   tempura-style rather than grilling it.  The new version of the fish taco became popular among local Mexicans and North American tourists, except they favored a crispier crust.  A U.S. college student was so impressed with the Baja fish taco he opened a restaurant serving them in San Diego in 1983.  He now operates a chain of 200 fish taco restaurants.

Here's what I got:

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That's a lot of food on the plate for 160 baht!

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Everything- the fish, veggies and tortillas- was fresh and tasted fine, although I could have done with less lettuce and more salsa.  I had to use a knife and fork to eat the mound of green stuff, but a taco is a quintessential finger food. 

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The original Baja fish tacos were  served in corn tortillas and topped with purple cabbage, salsa and Mexican crema (similar to crème fraiche), but since moving across the border to the U.S.,  fish tacos have taken on many variations.

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 Each of the fish fillets was good-sized and flaky with a crisp batter.  I had no real complaint with the tacos, just some niggling about details. Were they the best fish tacos I ever had?  No, but they were good and they aren't very common in Pattaya.

A breakfast sandwich  with a Jimmy-Dean-style sausage patty, fried egg and cheese on a in-house-made biscuit is another classic American dish and well worth 150 baht.

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It's the biscuit that makes the sandwich for me, but the sausage patty was also good.

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I topped off the sandwich with a piece of in-house carrot cake.  It was delicious.  Neither the cream cheese frosting  nor the cake were too sweet and the frosting had the proper tang. The crushed walnut atop the frosting was a really good touch.  

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The Monday specials at Tigglebitties center on  BBQ ribs and chicken:

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It's a good way to satisfy a BBQ fix at a fair price.  The pics Tigglebitties uses to illustrate its specials correspond closely to what you get on your plate.

Bottom line:  Tigglebitties is one of the best options in Pattaya for American food- and that includes Tex-Mex and Mexico-inspired dishes.  The main dishes and sides, such as coleslaw and potato salad, taste like they would back in the USA.  The staff is friendly and speak better English than is often the case in Pattaya restaurants. Prices are reasonable given the quality of the food and the large portions.

Evil

Edited by Evil Penevil
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Davethailand will have plenty to add about Tigglebitties, but the chef/female owner, a Thai chick married to an American (at that time anyway) told me that she had worked in an Asian restaurant in California, and the Mexicans working in the kitchen taught her how to cook Mexican food in exchange for her teaching them to cook Thai and Asian dishes.  Who knows what's true, but I think it's very evident that she knows American food, especially Tex-Mex.

9 hours ago, Evil Penevil said:

Bottom line:  Tigglebitties is one of the best options in Pattaya for American food- and that includes Tex-Mex and Mexico-inspired dishes.

Absolutely agree.  As an aside, it's a good place to hang out when the regulars are in, and the girls play pretty good pool if that's a plus for anyone.  One of my favorites in Pattaya for a long time.

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7 hours ago, Rompho Ray said:

...  but I think it's very evident that she knows American food, especially Tex-Mex.

Yes, she does.  Many Thai chefs/cooks who prepare farang food don't know how it should taste.

And equally important, she has been able to achieve consistency in the food that comes out of the kitchen over a number of years.  That's a rarity in Pattaya.

I posted this before, but I'll do it again.  The Thanksgiving dinner at Tigglebitties was excellent, a clear indication she knows her stuff (and stuffing).

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Really good apple pie, too!

Evil

Edited by Evil Penevil
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" Many Thai chefs/cooks who prepare farang food don't know how it should taste."

Could be said of any "non native" cook. A chef, well a real chef should have had the training and know a bit more.

My ex was an excellent cook as she studied 2 years in France, lived with a family of French people who teached her.

Miss Indo starts now, after a few years to have a fair idea as well and is able to make the right comments when we eat in western places. 

At home she cooks as per the book, but sometimes splits the dish in two parts and then gives an "Asian touch" to her part. Like adding chilli in a white cream sauce.....😭😭😭😱😱😱

 

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Thai Spice said:

Could be said of any "non native" cook. A chef, well a real chef should have had the training and know a bit more.

If any individual is interested in foreign food and eats a fair amount of it, they get an idea of how it should taste, even if they aren't   professional chefs or cooks.  That's more or less the case with your Miss Indo.

However, many Thai cooks (not professionally trained Thai chefs. but the informally taught cooks in smaller restaurants) have never eaten farang food and only prepare it from a recipe.  I recall once a cook in a Thai restaurant asked me if my plate of food was OK.  She said she had never tasted that dish- "only make it" -because she doesn't like farang food and it all tastes bad to her. 

Evil

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20 minutes ago, Evil Penevil said:

If any individual is interested in foreign food and eats a fair amount of it, they get an idea of how it should taste, even if they aren't   professional chefs or cooks.  That's more or less the case with your Miss Indo.

However, many Thai cooks (not professionally trained Thai chefs. but the informally taught cooks in smaller restaurants) have never eaten farang food and only prepare it from a recipe.  I recall once a cook in a Thai restaurant asked me if my plate of food was OK.  She said she had never tasted that dish- "only make it" -because she doesn't like farang food and it all tastes bad to her. 

Evil

Fully agree. And one of the reasons I avoid most cheap western food places run by a local. Enhance on "cheap", as no way to have a properly trained person with very low prices.

Here in Sanur, I noted that most of the lower / middle categorie places offer very similar dishes on their menu. So I am sure they buy them from a catering distributor, or a "group kitchen" and just reheat them (sometime enhancing them a bit). Typical example are the shrimp/avocado salads, lamb shank, etc...that I had here in several places. 

Mind you, it is also a current practice nowadays in lower priced restaurants in big  or touristic cities in France. I saw a few documentaries on this. The usual reason being "impossible to offer such a variety of dishes fresh/home made timewise and money wise". 

Several big companies offer extensive catalogues to the restaurants covering from starters to desserts. And for the price it tastes OK.  Usual "vacuum cooked" (cuisson sous vide) or something like that.

But its industrial.

 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, Thai Spice said:

Mind you, it is also a current practice nowadays in lower priced restaurants in big  or touristic cities in France. I saw a few documentaries on this. The usual reason being "impossible to offer such a variety of dishes fresh/home made timewise and money wise". 

Several big companies offer extensive catalogues to the restaurants covering from starters to desserts. And for the price it tastes OK.  Usual "vacuum cooked" (cuisson sous vide) or something like that.

But its industrial.

I've heard that quite a few Indian restaurants in Pattaya do this.   Almost all the meals in some of these restaurants come from vacuum packs.

Evil

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25 minutes ago, Evil Penevil said:

I've heard that quite a few Indian restaurants in Pattaya do this.   Almost all the meals in some of these restaurants come from vacuum packs.

Evil

http://www.cuisinesolutions.fr

https://www.brake.fr/les-produits/les-plats-cuisines/les-plats-a-accompagner/c/30H3

Just a few examples in France....

Pretty sure it is a common practice now in many places. 

Edit :  http://www.cuisinesolutions.fr/produits/

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Thai Spice said:

Pretty it is a common practice now in many places. 

It's done in the U.S. as well.  A small restaurant will have a lengthy menu, but only the most popular dishes are made fresh daily.  The ones that are ordered only occasionally come from the ready-to-serve vacuum packs or even frozen meals.   😲  The restaurant owners say it is the only way they can remain in business.

Jesus wept.

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Evil

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7 minutes ago, Evil Penevil said:

It's done in the U.S. as well.  A small restaurant will have a lengthy menu, but only the most popular dishes are made fresh daily.  The ones that are ordered only occasionally come from the ready-to-serve vacuum packs or even frozen meals.   😲  The restaurant owners say it is the only way they can remain in business.

Jesus wept.

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Evil

From what I know and guess, some more "noble" places even in BKK, will prepare say 10 portions of something, vacuum cooking it and stock it for later use. 

Seems sensible, they keep their own recipe, and its cooked "in house" but the vacuum technology allows to keep it for many weeks and at the same time keeping a better "fresh made" feeling than deep frozen.

Ok, sorry for the TF but I think it is interesting to be know this.

 

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Never been to Robin Hood Tavern - but it does look good...saw these on Facebook. Will definitely contribute to this topic once I am back in Pattaya - currently surviving on rig food in Saudi so nothing worth posting 😂

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